The Townsfolk in Winter

1

May 2, 2018 by The Citron Review

by Tim Hawkins 

 

Scurrying together, uniting at the flagpole, chapped hands of greeting concealed like their expressions lost inside cavernous hoods, some hail me with a terse nod.

But, I do not join their prayer for unborn souls. Instead, I watch the wind scatter each breath rising toward heaven. And they do not attack me with hands grown numb, as if their fingers had never plucked a fragile, night-blooming flower.

They add me, instead, to their list of unborn souls, clasp their raw and bleeding hands together, and maintain a stolid circle against the cold.

 
Tim Hawkins spent two decades living and traveling around the world. His short fiction and poetry can be found in numerous print and online magazines and anthologies He has published a poetry collection, Wanderings at Deadline (Aldrich Press, 2012) and a poetry chapbook, Jeremiad Johnson (In Case of Emergency Press, 2019). A story and poetry chapbook, Synchronized Swimmers, is available in early October 2019 from KYSO Flash Press. Find out more at his website: www.timhawkinspoetry.com
 

One thought on “The Townsfolk in Winter

  1. […] With wet palms, overwhelming nausea, we drive blind to kingdom come. Stragglers are left beneath the beating sun. At an impromptu funeral, the earth will open easy for our shovels. A cloud of dust will kick up. Our sneeze will ricochet off the ancient church stones. Another may kick us in the guts. Will the wind scatter our very breath to heaven? […]

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Snow on brush in desert

IMAGE CREDIT: Jill Katherine Chmelko. Protest Road, Winter. 2019.

🍋Our Tenth Anniversary

 

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