Creative Nonfiction Spotlight

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Letter from the Editor

 

Sacrifice is inevitable. Eventually, each one of us will have to make a sacrifice that ends up altering the rest of our lives.

But these stories can be some of the hardest to write. Embarking on them, the writer risks sentimentality, cliche, the challenge of rendering your most vivid memories alive on the page. “Experience doesn’t matter just because it happened to you” a great creative writing professor of mine has been known to say, and those are wise words to remember. At best, stories about family and loss can be some of the most transformative, heart wrenching, inspiring, the ones that make us feel less alone because we recognize ourselves in them.

The stories we selected for our special Summer 2015 Creative Nonfiction mini-issue tackle these themes masterfully. The narrator of each is haunted by a sacrifice. In “A Thousand More,” Cheryl Smart shares a heartbreaking story of a difficult decision regarding a family pet. In “Buttercream Cake,” Ani Tascian tells of a dying father’s birthday party, seen through his daughter’s eyes. In “The Next 32 Years,” Steven Coughlin imagines the future of a seasoned mill worker, foreseeing a life challenged by the drudgery of routine and harsh conditions. And in Sue Granzella’s “Breakfast at IHOP,” a woman dines with her husband after a frightening procedure, leading her to reflect on the status of her marriage.

We can take comfort in our pain, knowing nobody is immune to suffering. In that way we will never suffer alone.

Erica Moody 
Creative Nonfiction Editor

 

Table of Contents

Cheryl Smart A Thousand More
Ani Tascian Buttercream Cake
Steven Coughlin The Next 32 Years
Sue Granzella Breakfast at IHOP
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🍋10th Anniversary

Fall 2019 IssueSeptember 23rd, 2019
90 days to go.

🍋 Instagram

The Summer 2019 Issue of the The Citron Review is brimming with amazing contributors. We want to thank them and hope you'll thank them too! Erik Moellering, Andrea Jurjević, David Galloway, Jennifer Metsker, Kendall Babl, Rogan Kelly, B.J. Best, Melanie McGee Bianchi, Emanuele Pettener, Thomas De Angelis, A. Grifa Ismaili, Julie Watson, Jill Chmelko, Kelle Schillaci Clarke, Phyllis Reilly, Elyse Giaimo, Anita Goveas, Mary Grimm, Carla Scarano D’Antonio, Megan Anning. #amreading #anonlinejournalofbriefliterature
Catch up with our managing editor @ericsteineger in the latest issue of Tinderbox Poetry Journal. #saturdayread #amreading #TheCitronreview #tinderboxpoetryjournal https://tinderboxpoetry.com/catching-up-with-tinderbox
In Citron’s 10th summer issue on this longest day in the sun we bring you stories of vulnerability and meaning. We also offer something new. As part of our 10th anniversary we have created Zest, a place for our editors to share essays, reviews, and other posts in between our four annual issues. Zest’s first feature is a review written by Managing Editor and Senior Poetry Editor @ericsteineger. You can find his review of @jerzypoet's debut chapbook, Demolition in the Tropics as the last item in our summer issue and on Zest’s page. It’s been an amazing ten years of stories. In September we will publish the fall issue as well as a look back at 10 years of The Citron Review. To our readers and contributors, thank you for being a part of our story. #CitronSix #CitronStories #Summer2019 #SummerIssue #TheCitronReview #cheersto10years #amreading #summersolstice #summerreading
"Immaculate" by Anne-Marie Hoeve takes us into the secret life of spoons in this carefully arranged micro fiction. https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/immaculate/ #amreading #thecitronreview #spring2019
Christopher Rabley's "I Can See Her" is his second publication in The Citron Review and we join him in Taipei City for a most trying time. His first nonfiction story is from 2017, "Speak to Me". Please read them together, if you wish. https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/i-can-see-her/ https://citronreview.com/2017/12/21/speak-to-me/ #amreading #thecitronreview #spring2019
We are expanding our team of editors. This fall marks our 10 year anniversary as a volunteer operated journal, and we look forward to another ten. We love what we do and hope that you will consider joining us. Send your inquiries to citronreview at gmail.com. Open until filled #TheCitronReview #amreading #CreativeNonfiction https://citronreview.com/

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