In Wisconsin

2

October 3, 2016 by The Citron Review

by Ellen Stone

 

Sunday afternoon, late
sun slanting down the highway
gassing up to drive, I make a U turn
from the station knowing I am wrong.
There are signs telling me but, wanting
a quick get away for the long road home.
When the police officer appears
at my car window, I mention my daughter’s
graduation on campus. My aging mother
in the front seat. I do not mention whiteness.
We sit in the road while vehicles swarm,
then bend around us, like a creek
when a branch blocks its flow, making a way.
Just a warning, he says.

Later, over a rise on the hot asphalt
toward Milwaukee, swirls of red lights
flash by the side of the expressway.
Four police cars hum there, and one lone
man, young, brown skinned, stands
hands above his head in a gesture akin
to prayer or a plea to the sky while his wrists
are shackled. We hurtle past, this image
imprinting already into a kind of archetype
that follows us, silently, past the city
around the lake, and across the fields
green with corn. Jesus, left there.
Us, driving by. Summer, just beginning
to swelter.

 

Ellen Stone teaches at Community High School in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Her poems have appeared recently in Passages North, Lunch Ticket, and The Collagist, and are forthcoming in Fifth Wednesday, among other publications. Michigan Writers Cooperative Press published Ellen’s poetry chapbook, The Solid Living World.

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2 thoughts on “In Wisconsin

  1. Wow, Ellen. What a beautifully sad poem.

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Fall 2019 IssueSeptember 23rd, 2019
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We have some happy news to share! The Citron Review contributor Amye Archer has joined our Creative Nonfiction editorial team. Let's welcome her! Amye Archer - Author of Fat Girl, Skinny: A Memoir, and is the co-editor of If I Don't Make It, I Love You: Survivors in the Aftermath of School Shootings. (Skyhorse Publishing, Inc., 2019). She holds an MFA from Wilkes University. Amye's work has been published in Scary Mommy, Longreads, Feminine Collective, Brevity, Marie Claire, and more. Amye is mom to twin daughters and wife to Tim. She lives in Northeast Pennsylvania. Follow her at @amyearcher https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/one-week/ #briefliterature #cheerstotenyears #amreading #TheCitronReview #creativenonfiction
We're pleased to highlight creative nonfiction from Julie Watson. "Odds Are" is now available in our Summer Issue. https://citronreview.com/2019/06/21/odds-are/ #amreading #flashcnf #summerissue #cheersto10years
Anita Goveas, @raspberrybakewell, has fiction featured in our Summer Issue. https://citronreview.com/2019/06/21/coverings/ #amreading #flashfiction #summerissue #cheersto10years
New Flash Fiction from Mary Grimm, who has published a novel, Left to Themselves and a collection of stories, Stealing Time (which are both on Random House). She teaches fiction writing at Case Western Reserve University. https://citronreview.com/…/…/21/the-dream-of-her-long-dying/ #TheCitronReview #SummerIssue #Summer2019 #flashfiction #cheersto10years
Creative Nonfiction from our new Summer issue, "What About Me?" by Phyllis Reilly. https://citronreview.com/2019/06/21/what-about-me/ #TheCitronReview #SummerIssue #Summer2019 #flashcnf #cheersto10years
From our summer issue, "How Much Snow" by Erik Moellering. Erik Moellering teaches English at A-B Tech Community College in Asheville, NC, where he also performs in a variety of theatrical productions. https://citronreview.com/2019/06/21/how-much-snow/ #TheCitronReview #SummerIssue #CitronSix #Summer2019 #poetry #cheersto10years

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