Cheap

Leave a comment

March 1, 2014 by The Citron Review

by P.J. Sambeaux

 

My mother would only go to the  laundromat in the shittiest part of town, across the bridge, because their machines took four dimes instead of four quarters. She went in the day after a woman had been abducted from the laundrymat and presumed dead because of the amount of blood left at the scene. My mother said there was still blood spattered on the ceiling, and the ceiling was very high – the building having been converted from some kind of defunct factory. She kept going to that laundrymat, even after that – undeterred by the murder. She brought me along once, not long after that happened, so she could carry even more laundry, thus making the trip even more economical. I couldn’t keep my eyes off that high ceiling, festooned with carcass-encrusted fly paper swaying in the breeze from ancient fans, thinking about the last few moments of someone’s life, and dimes versus quarters.

 

P.J. Sambeaux grew up in Appalachian Ohio, where much of her writing – both fiction and non fiction – takes place. She currently resides in Pittsburgh and is working on her second fiction novel, The Art of Gift Giving and Saying Goodbye.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

🍋10th Anniversary

Fall 2019 IssueSeptember 23rd, 2019
5 months to go.

🍋 Instagram

Robert Carr’s “Anchor” is what happens when the tangible aspects of heritage are missing. The speaker is left holding a telephone cord and the remnants of his mother’s voice getting further away. A concise stack of images begin the poem, taking us back to a time when the simplicity of toys meant family. In Carr’s hands, the poem is rooted and rootless at the same time, and now I reflect on the rotary phone, heirlooms from old houses, and my people. -Eric Steineger Managing Editor/Senior #amreading #TheCitronReview #Spring2019Issue #10thanniversary #cheersto10years https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/anchor/
The Center, if it holds, requires the Hole, as if the Spiral were pressed in a vinyl disk. Set the heart of Nothing on the spindle and start the record round; "Record" by James B. Nicola #TheCitronReview #Spring2019 #amreading https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/record/
Marriage! That blessed arrangement! https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/white-wedding/ #amreading #microfiction #weddingstories
Now in our Spring Issue, Helen Chambers invites us to read now of forever hold our peace. https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/spring-wedding/ #amreading #microfiction #weddingstories
Knitters of the world, unite! "Turtles" is a needle-gripping flash from @kaelyhorton . March with us toward passionate prose. (Stitching now our handmade Spring 2019 Issue.) https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/turtles/ #amreading #flashfiction
Tornado of Flash Fiction Warning! https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/outside-of-oklahoma/ #amreading #Spring2019 #TheCitronReview #cheerstotenyears

Enter your email address to follow us and receive notifications of new issues by email.

%d bloggers like this: