How to Find Deceptive Cognates

1

September 14, 2010 by The Citron Review

by Diane Kendig

 

You will at first adopt them all, thinking them related.
(You might take grifo for “grief,”
as I once took it from my hostess, wringing
her hands over a sink, sighing, qué grifo!
Later, I insisted to my host,
“I don’t want to be any faucet for you.”)

Now, you can memorize lists of changelings
and avoid asking pharmacists for soup
or confessing pregnancy when you mean
embarrassment, but new ones are born
faster than “most wanted” posters. So:
study your listener’s face.

If it is the face of a man confronted by
a woman who thinks she’s a faucet, or say,
of a woman whose new love, shaving off
his beard, suddenly looks enough like
her first boyfriend to be his brother, you
have found another deceptive cognate.

 

Diane Kendig’s recent chapbook is titled, The Places We Find Ourselves. Her poetry and nonfiction work may also be found in J Journal, Minnesota Review, qarrtsiluni, and others. A recipient of two Ohio Arts Council Fellowships in Poetry and a Fulbright lectureship in translation, Diane is a Midwesterner currently out of place in the Boston area where she teaches at Bentley University.

Advertisements

One thought on “How to Find Deceptive Cognates

  1. Claire Keyes says:

    Diane—what a delightful poem. I love the wit.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

🍋10th Anniversary

Fall 2019 IssueSeptember 23rd, 2019
5 months to go.

🍋 Instagram

Robert Carr’s “Anchor” is what happens when the tangible aspects of heritage are missing. The speaker is left holding a telephone cord and the remnants of his mother’s voice getting further away. A concise stack of images begin the poem, taking us back to a time when the simplicity of toys meant family. In Carr’s hands, the poem is rooted and rootless at the same time, and now I reflect on the rotary phone, heirlooms from old houses, and my people. -Eric Steineger Managing Editor/Senior #amreading #TheCitronReview #Spring2019Issue #10thanniversary #cheersto10years https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/anchor/
The Center, if it holds, requires the Hole, as if the Spiral were pressed in a vinyl disk. Set the heart of Nothing on the spindle and start the record round; "Record" by James B. Nicola #TheCitronReview #Spring2019 #amreading https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/record/
Marriage! That blessed arrangement! https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/white-wedding/ #amreading #microfiction #weddingstories
Now in our Spring Issue, Helen Chambers invites us to read now of forever hold our peace. https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/spring-wedding/ #amreading #microfiction #weddingstories
Knitters of the world, unite! "Turtles" is a needle-gripping flash from @kaelyhorton . March with us toward passionate prose. (Stitching now our handmade Spring 2019 Issue.) https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/turtles/ #amreading #flashfiction
Tornado of Flash Fiction Warning! https://citronreview.com/2019/03/20/outside-of-oklahoma/ #amreading #Spring2019 #TheCitronReview #cheerstotenyears

Enter your email address to follow us and receive notifications of new issues by email.

%d bloggers like this: